Wholesale Price H13 Tool Steel | 1.2344 | X40CrMoV5-1 | SKD61 Hot Work Steel Factory from New Orleans

Wholesale Price
 H13 Tool Steel | 1.2344 | X40CrMoV5-1 | SKD61 Hot Work Steel Factory from New Orleans

Short Description:

H13 Tool Steel is chromium hot work tool steels which are widely used in hot and cold work tooling applications. H13 tool steel is classified as group H steels by the AISI classification system. This series of steels start from H1 to H19. AISI H-13 tool steel is characterized by: Good resistance to abrasion at both low and high temperatures High level of toughness and ductility Uniform and high level of machinability and polishability Good high-temperature strength and resistance to t...


  • Length: 3-5.8mm or Customization
  • Surface: black, peeled, or rough turned
  • Heat treatment: air-cooling, normalized, annealed, Q&T
  • Smelting process: EAF+LF+VD
  • Product Detail

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    Our products are widely recognized and trusted by users and can meet continuously developing economic and social needs for Wholesale Price H13 Tool Steel | 1.2344 | X40CrMoV5-1 | SKD61 Hot Work Steel Factory from New Orleans, We welcome new and old customers from all walks of life to contact us for future business relationships and mutual success!


    H13 Tool Steel is chromium hot work tool steels which are widely used in hot and cold work tooling applications. H13 tool steel is classified as group H steels by the AISI classification system. This series of steels start from H1 to H19.

    AISI H-13 tool steel is characterized by:

    • Good resistance to abrasion at both low and high temperatures

    • High level of toughness and ductility

    • Uniform and high level of machinability and polishability

    • Good high-temperature strength and resistance to thermal fatigue

    • Excellent through-hardening properties

    • Very limited distortion during hardening

    In
    steel H13, the molybdenum and vanadium act as strengthening agents. The
    chromium content assists die steel H-13 to resist softening when used
    at high temperatures. H-13 die steels offers an excellent combination of
    shock and abrasion resistance, and possesses good red hardness. It is
    capable of withstanding rapid cooling and resists premature heat
    checking. Tool Steel H13 has good machinability, good weldability, good
    ductility, and can be formed by conventional means.

    Due to H13
    tool steel excellent combination of high toughness and fatigue
    resistance, AISI H13 hot work tool steel is used more than any other
    tool steel in tooling applications.

    1. Common H13 Tool Steel Related Specifications

    Country USA German Japan
    Standard ASTM A681 DIN EN ISO 4957 JIS G4404
    Grades H13 1.2344/X40CrMoV5-1 SKD61

    2. H13 Tool Steel Chemical Composition

    ASTM A681 C Mn P S Si Cr V Mo
    H13 0.32 0.45 0.2 0.6 0.03 0.03 0.8 1.25 4.75 5.5 0.8 1.2 1.1 1.75
    DIN ISO 4957 C Mn P S Si Cr V Mo
    1.2344 /X40CrMoV5-1 0.35 0.42 0.25 0.5 0.03 0.02 0.8 1.2 4.8 5.5 0.85 1.15 1.1 1.5
    JIS G4404 C Mn P S Si Cr V Mo
    SKD61 0.35 0.42 0.25 0.5 0.03 0.02 0.8 1.2 4.8 5.5 0.8 1.15 1.0 1.5

    3. AISI H13 Steel Mechanical Properties

    Properties

    Metric Imperial
    Tensile strength, ultimate (@20°C/68°F, varies with heat treatment) 1200 – 1590 MPa 174000 – 231000 psi
    Tensile strength, yield (@20°C/68°F, varies with heat treatment) 1000 – 1380 MPa 145000 – 200000 psi
    Reduction of area (@20°C/68°F) 50.00% 50.00%
    Modulus of elasticity (@20°C/68°F) 215 GPa 31200 ksi
    Poisson’s ratio 0.27-0.30 0.27-0.30

    4. Forging of H13 Tool Steel
    Heating for forging must be done slowly and uniformly. Soak through at
    1900°-2000°F and reheat as often as necessary, stopping work when the
    temperature drops below 1650°F. After forging, cool slowly in lime,
    mica, dry ashes or furnace. H-13 should always be annealed after
    forging.

    5. Heat Treatment for H13 Tool Steels

    • Annealing

    Heat
    slowly to 1550°-1650°F, hold until entire mass is heated through, and
    cool slowly in the furnace (40F per hour) to about 1000°F, after which
    cooling rate may be increased. Suitable precautions must be taken to
    prevent excessive carburization or decarburization.

    • Stress Relieving

    When
    desirable to relieve the strains of machining, heat slowly to
    1050°-1250°F, allow to equalize, and then cool in still air (Strain
    Relieving). Â

    • Preheat Prior to Hardening

    Warm slightly before charging into the preheat furnace, which should be operating at 1400°-1500°F.

    • Hardening

    H13
    tool steel is a steel having very high hardenability and should be
    hardened by cooling in still air. The use of a salt bath or controlled
    atmosphere furnace is desirable to minimize decarburization, and if not
    available, pack hardening in spent pitch coke is suggested. The
    temperature employed is usually 1800°-1850°F, depending on size section.

    • Quenching

    Quench
    in still air or dry air blast. If complicated forms are to be hardened,
    an interrupted oil quench can be used. Quench part in oil and remove
    from bath when it just loses its color (1000°-1100°F). Finish cooling to
    below 150°-125°F in air, then temper immediately.

    • Tempering

    Tempering
    practice may vary with size and application, but is usually performed
    in the range of maximum secondary hardness or higher. Double tempering
    is recommended. The results below is H13 that was air quenched from
    1800°F and tempered for 4 hours at various temperatures. The results may
    be used as a guide, keeping in mind that parts of heavy section or mass
    may be several points lower in hardness.

    6. Application of AISI H13 Tool Steel

    • As Tools for Extrusion

    Part Aluminium, mag­nesium alloys, HRC Copper al­loys HRC Stainless steel HRC
    Dies, Backers, die-holders, liners, dummy blocks, stems 44-50 43-47 45-50
    41-50 40-48 40-48

    Austenitizing temperature

    1,870-1,885°F 1,900-1,920°F
    (1,020-1,030°C) (1,040-1,050°C)
    • As Plastic Molding Tool Steel

    Part Austenitizing temp. HRC
    Injection molds Compression/ transfer molds 1,870-1,885°F (1,020-1,030°C) 50-52
    Tempering 480°F (250°C)
    • Other Applications

    Applications Austenitizing temp HRC
    Severe cold punching, scrap shears 1,870-1,885°F 50-52
    (1,020-1,030°C)
    Tempering 480°F (250°C)
    Hot shearing 1,870-1,885°F
    (1,020-1,030°C) 50-52
    Tempering 480°F (250°C) or
    1,070-1,110°F 45-50
    (575-600°C)
    Shrink rings (e.g. for cemented carbide dies) 1,870-1,885°F 45-50
    (1,020-1,030°C)
    Tempering 1,070-1,110°F
    (575–600°C)
    Wear-resisting parts 1,870-1,885°F Core
    50-52
    Surface
    ~1000HV1
    (1,020-1,030°C)
    Tempering 1,070°F (575°C)
    nitrided

     

    If
    there are any queries about AISI H13 tool steel for hot working
    applications, please feel free to leave a comment below. And welcome
    enquiry of AISI H13 tool steel, we are professional and reliable
    supplier  for prime H13 tool steel materials.

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    I invented the Bow Blower, a combination of the bow drill and forge blower to make a device that can force air into a fire while being easy to construct from commonly occurring natural materials using only primitive technology. I began by fanning a fire with a piece of bark to increase its temperature. It is this basic principle I improved on throughout the project.
    Next, I made a rotary fan from two pieces of bark that slot together at right angles to each other to form a simple 4 bladed paddle wheel about 20 cm in diameter and 5 cm tall. The blades of the fan were not angled and were designed only to throw air outwards away from the axle when spun. The rotor of the fan was made by splitting a stick two ways so it formed 4 prongs. The fan was then inserted into the prongs and the end lashed to hold it in place. Spinning the fan rotor back and forth between the palms of the hands fanned the fire. But only some of the wind generated by the fan reached the fire. The rest of it was blowing in other directions, effectively being wasted.
    So I built a fan housing from unfired clay to direct the air flow into the fire. This was basically an upturned pot with a hole in the top, a spout coming out of the side. The housing was about 25 cm wide and 8 cm tall. The hole in the top and the spout were both about 6 cm in diameter so that the air coming in roughly equalled the air coming out. The base of the fan rotor sat in a wooden socket placed in the ground to make it spin easier and the top of the rotor protruded from the hole in the top of the housing.
    Now when the fan spun, air entered the hole in the top of the housing and exited the spout in the side. Importantly, it doesn’t matter which way the fan spins, air always goes into the inlet and out the spout. Air is thrown out towards the walls of the housing and can only leave through the spout while the vacuum in the centre sucks new air into the housing through the inlet. A separate clay pipe called a tuyere was made to fit over the spout to direct air into the coals. This was done because the pipe that touches the fire can melt away so it’s better to make this part replaceable.
    Instead of making a large wheel and belt assembly to step up the speed of rotation, I opted for a 75 cm long bow. I made a frame to hold the rotor in place consisting of two stakes hammered into the ground with a socketed cross bar lashed on to hold the top of the rotor. I made bark fibre cordage and tied the end to a stick. I then looped the cord around the rotor and held the other end in the same hand holding the stick. I then pushed and pulled the bow causing the rotor to spin rapidly, forcing air into the fire.
    I made a simple mud furnace for the blower. Then I collected orange iron bacteria from the creek (iron oxide), mixed it with charcoal powder (carbon to reduce oxide to metal) and wood ash (flux to lower the melting point) and formed it into a cylindrical brick. I filled the furnace with charcoal, put the ore brick in and commenced firing. The ore brick melted and produced slag with tiny, 1mm sized specs of iron through it. My intent was not so much to make iron but to show that the furnace can reach a fairly high temperature using this blower. A taller furnace called a bloomery was generally used in ancient times to produce usable quantities of iron and consumed more charcoal, ore and labour.
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