Hot Selling for M2 Tool Steel | 1.3343 | HS-6-5-2C| SKH51 Manufacturer in Los Angeles

Hot Selling for
 M2 Tool Steel | 1.3343 | HS-6-5-2C| SKH51 Manufacturer in Los Angeles

Short Description:

AISI M2 Tool Steel is molybdenum based high-speed steel in tungsten–molybdenum series. HSS grade steel M2 is a medium alloyed high speed steel which has good machinability. The H-SS M2 chemical composition gives a good combination of well-balanced toughness, wear resistance and red hardness properties. Widely used for cutting tools such as twist drills, taps, milling cutters, saws, knives etc. Also commonly used in cold work punches and dies and cutting applications involving high speed...


  • Length: 3-5.8mm or Customization
  • Surface: black, peeled, or rough turned
  • Heat treatment: air-cooling, normalized, annealed, Q&T
  • Smelting process: EAF+LF+VD
  • Product Detail

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    abide by the contract", conforms to the market requirement, joins in the market competition by its high quality as well as provides more comprehensive and excellent service for clients to let them become big winner. The pursue of the company, is the clients' satisfaction for Hot Selling for M2 Tool Steel | 1.3343 | HS-6-5-2C| SKH51 Manufacturer in Los Angeles, If you are interested in our products, please feel free to send us your inquiry. We sincerely hope to establish win-win business relationships with you.


    AISI M2 Tool Steel is molybdenum based high-speed steel in tungsten–molybdenum series. HSS grade steel M2
    is a medium alloyed high speed steel which has good machinability. The
    H-SS M2 chemical composition gives a good combination of well-balanced
    toughness, wear resistance and red hardness properties. Widely used for
    cutting tools such as twist drills, taps, milling cutters, saws, knives
    etc. Also commonly used in cold work punches and dies and cutting
    applications involving high speed and light cuts.

    Grade M2 High Speed Steel is by far the most popular high speed steel replacing high speed steel grade T1 in most applications because of its superior properties and relative economy.

    1. Common M2 Tool Steel Related Specifications and Equivalents

    Country USA German Japan
    Standard ASTM A600 DIN EN ISO 4957 JIS G4403
    Grades M2 1.3343 SKH51

    2. ASTM M2 Tool Steel Chemical Composition Properties

    ASTM A600 C Mn P S Si Cr V Mo W
    M2 regular C 0.78 0.88 0.15 0.40 0.03 0.03 0.20 0.45 3.75 4.50 1.75 2.20 4.50 5.50 5.50 6.75
    DIN ISO 4957 C Mn P S Si Cr V Mo W
    1.3343 0.86 0.94 0.45 3.80 4.50 1.70 2.10 4.70 5.20 5.90 6.70
    JIS G4403 C Mn P S Si Cr V Mo W
    SKH51 0.80 0.88 0.40 0.03 0.03 0.45 3.80 4.50 1.70 2.10 4.70 5.20 5.90 6.70

    3. AISI HSS M2 Tool Steel Mechanical Properties

    • Physical Properties of HSS M2 Material

    Density         0.294 lb/in3 (8138 kg/m3)
    Specific Gravity                  8.15
    Modulus of Elasticity         0.294 lb/in3 (8138 kg/m3)
    Thermal conductivity         24 Btu/ft/hr/°F  41.5 W/m/°K
    Machinability          65% of a 1% carbon steel
    • AISI M2 Tool Steels Properties Mechanical

    Mechanical properties Metric Imperial
    Hardness, Rockwell C (tempered at 1150°F, quenched at 2200°F) 62 62
    Hardness, Rockwell C (as hardened, quenched at 2200°F) 65 65
    Compressive yield strength (when tempered at 300°F) 3250 MPa 471000 psi
    Izod impact unnotched (when tempered at 300°F) 67 J 49.4 ft-lb
    Abrasion (loss in mm3, as-hardened; ASTM G65) 25.8 25.8
    Abrasion (loss in mm3, tempered at 1275°F; ASTM G65) 77.7 77.7
    Poisson’s ratio 0.27-0.30 0.27-0.30
    Elastic modulus 190-210 GPa 27557-30458 ksi
    • M2 Steels Thermal Properties

    Thermal properties Metric Imperial
    CTE, linear (@20.0 – 100°C/ 68.0 – 212°F) 10 μm/m°C 5.56 μin/in°F
    CTE, linear (@20.0 – 500°C/68.0 – 932°F) 12.2 μm/m°C 6.78 μin/in°F
    CTE, linear (@20.0 – 850°C/68.0 – 1560°F) 12.6 μm/m°C 7 μin/in°F

    4. Forging of AISI M2 High Speed Steel

    Pre
    heat M2 HSS steel slowly and uniformly to 850-900°C. The heat should
    then be increased more quickly to the forging temperature of
    1050-1150°C. If during the forging
    the temperature of the M2 high speed tool steel material drops below
    880-900°C, re-heating will be necessary. Cool the M2 steel component
    very slowly after forging.

    5. Heat Treatment of M2 Steel HSS

    • Anneal

    Heat
    to 1600° F, soak thoroughly at heat. Furnace cool 25° F per hour to
    900° F, air cool to room temperature. Approximate annealed hardness 241
    Maximum Brinell.

    Stress Relief of Unhardened Material: Heat slowly
    to 1200 to 1250° F. Soak for two hours per inch of thickness at heat.
    Slow cool (furnace cool if possible) to room temperature.

    • Hardening

    Preheat: Heat slowly to 1550° F, soak thoroughly, heat to 1850° F, soak thoroughly.

    • Harden

    Soak
    time in the furnace varies from a few minutes to a 15 minutes,
    depending tool size, heat capacity of the furnace, and the size of the
    charge. – Heat to 2150 to 2200° F for max. toughness and minimum
    distortion. – Heat to 2250 to 2275° F for max. hardness and abrasion
    resistance.

    • Quench

    For full
    hardness, oil quench to 150-200° F. Air quench to 150° F. When quenching
    in hot salt maintain the quench just above the Ms temperature. After
    equalizing withdraw parts from the hot salt and air cooled to 150° F.

    • Temper

    Double
    temper is mandatory, three tempers are sometimes preferred. Soak for 2
    hours per inch of thickness. Air cool to room temperature between
    tempers. The best tempering range for hardness, strength and toughness
    is 1000 to 1050° F.

    Temper° F Rockwell “C” Temper° F Rockwell “C”
    As-quenched 64 900 64
    400 63 1000 65.5
    500 62.5 1050 63.5
    600 62.5 1100 61.5
    700 62.5 1150 60
    800 63.5 1200 53

    6. Machinability of AISI M2 Tool Steel H-SS

    Shaping
    of HSS M2 tool steels can be carried out using grinding methods.
    However, they have poor grinding capability and hence they are regarded
    as “medium” machinability tool steel under annealed conditions. The
    machinability of these tool steels M2 is only 50% of that of the easily
    machinable W group or water hardening tool steels.

    7. M2 Tool Steel Applications

    The main use of high-speed steels continues to be in the manufacture of various cutting tools.

    Typical
    applications for M2 high speed steel are twist drills, reamers,
    broaching tools, taps, milling tools, metal saws. M2 is suitable for
    cold forming tools such as extrusion rams and dies, also widely used in
    all kinds of cutting tools, knife and punches and die applications,
    plastic moulds with elevated wear resistance and screws.

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  • Machining, Hardening And Tempering A Form Tool For The Lathe, by Clickspring

    There’s something really classy about the old style rope knurls that you often see on tools made around the turn of the 19th century. Making them is quite an involved process, and one of the steps involves making a form tool to prepare the work surface for the impending knurl.

    This is the first video in a series of at least 3, that will relate to the subject of these beautiful ornamental knurl patterns

    The main project video that this video is related to is “Machining A Set Of ‘Vintage Style’ Rope Knurls “: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i9pD5vIHJ8M

    Free plans for the double angled cutter, and form tool:

    http://www.clickspringprojects.com/uploads/3/8/2/2/38221101/double_angled_cutter.pdf

    http://www.clickspringprojects.com/uploads/3/8/2/2/38221101/form_tool_profile.pdf

    If you would like to help support the creation of these videos, then head on over to the Clickspring Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/clickspring

    Ask Me A Question:

    http://www.clickspringprojects.com/contact.html

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    Transcript:
    00:05 I’m about to make some brass thumbwheels, with a vintage style rope knurl. But before I can form the knurl pattern, I need to shape the brass perimeter, so that the knurling tool will work correctly, and I’m going to do it using a form tool like this.
    00:20 The profile of the cutter is reasonably straight forward, but the relief angles require a bit of planning. I’ve chosen 10 degrees as the relief angle, and I should be able to take care of these front faces on the mill.
    00:29 Ideally I’d cut the central section with a tapered end mill, but I don’t have one. So instead I’ll drill it out and then finish it off by hand using a file. So starting with some 1/4″ O1 tool steel, I cut off a section, and then squared it up on the mill.
    00:54 Using this angle block, I set the work on a 10 degree angle in the vise, and then milled a datum face. I’m going to use the digital readout and this sharpened carbide rod to mark out some key points and lines. I milled a small flat for the drill point, and then drilled out the central section of the cutter profile.
    01:49 Ok so next I need to mill the work down to this reference line, as well as across to this corner, while at the same time generating the relief angles. I can take care of the main relief angle in a similar way as before, by using the angle block to tilt the work in the vise.
    02:05 And the second angle can be generated by using the swivel base of the vise. It’s not super accurate, but the relief angles don’t need to be overly precise, so its close enough for what I’m doing here today.
    02:33 This section here needs to be profiled into a curve, while at the same time generating the 10 degree relief. I think the easiest way to tackle this is to use the belt sander, so I’ve tilted the table to 10 degrees, to match the other face angles, and then using a 400 grit belt, I formed the curve.
    03:05 The curved section terminates at the point I marked out with the dro, and I’ve sanded as far into the corner as I dared, without risking the profile.
    03:42 A quick rub on an oilstone takes care of the small burrs, and that’s the bulk of the hard work done. The top profile has come through the process mostly unscathed, and all of the cutting edges now have the required relief.
    03:58 The last step is to quench harden the steel, and temper the cutting edge to a light straw. A quick polish on this oilstone, and its ready to be put to work.
    04:28 A form tool like is a great way to get a repeatable profile onto a short run of parts. There’s a few drawbacks in using them though, that are worth mentioning.
    04:37 Firstly, there’s a lot of cutter surface in contact with the work, particularly when it gets to the full depth, so it really is quite hard work for a small lathe like this. This cutter is about 15mm wide, and I’d say that its at the upper limit of what my lathe can cope with before it simply stalls.
    04:50 Secondly chatter on a tool like this is pretty much unavoidable. But I’ve found that using a low rpm and keeping everything as rigid as possible makes it quite manageable.
    05:25 Thanks for watching, I’ll see you later. If you’d like to see how the rope knurl pattern turned out, here’s the video covering that process.

    References:

    Frank Ford (Luthier/Machinist)

    http://www.frets.com/HomeShopTech/Projects/RopeKnurl/ropeknurl.html

    Machining, Hardening And Tempering A Form Tool For The Lathe, by Clickspring



    How to make a tanto tip survival knife,
    how to make a hunting,camping,survival knife at home from the stock removal method.
    steps.
    1.draw out knife on a heat treatable steel (1095,01,) not mild steel
    2.cut out the knife blank and grind it to shape ( angle grinder,bench grinder or files )
    3.bevel the knife ( i like to use files )
    4.heat treat the knife, heat the steel up until its non magnetic and then quench it in oil or water ( depending on the steel )
    5. temper the knife, heat it up in an oven to the tempering temperature for that steel and leave it in so you get the hardness that you want.
    6. polish, sharpen and attach handle scales ( aluminum and wood are good and cheap )

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