China Top 10 H13 Tool Steel | 1.2344 | X40CrMoV5-1 | SKD61 Hot Work Steel Manufacturer in Laos

China Top 10
 H13 Tool Steel | 1.2344 | X40CrMoV5-1 | SKD61 Hot Work Steel Manufacturer in Laos

Short Description:

H13 Tool Steel is chromium hot work tool steels which are widely used in hot and cold work tooling applications. H13 tool steel is classified as group H steels by the AISI classification system. This series of steels start from H1 to H19. AISI H-13 tool steel is characterized by: Good resistance to abrasion at both low and high temperatures High level of toughness and ductility Uniform and high level of machinability and polishability Good high-temperature strength and resistance to t...


  • Length: 3-5.8mm or Customization
  • Surface: black, peeled, or rough turned
  • Heat treatment: air-cooling, normalized, annealed, Q&T
  • Smelting process: EAF+LF+VD
  • Product Detail

    Product Tags

    We take "customer-friendly, quality-oriented, integrative, innovative" as objectives. "Truth and honesty" is our management ideal for China Top 10 H13 Tool Steel | 1.2344 | X40CrMoV5-1 | SKD61 Hot Work Steel Manufacturer in Laos, we are looking forward to even greater cooperation with overseas customers based on mutual benefits. Please feel free to contact us for more detail


    H13 Tool Steel is chromium hot work tool steels which are widely used in hot and cold work tooling applications. H13 tool steel is classified as group H steels by the AISI classification system. This series of steels start from H1 to H19.

    AISI H-13 tool steel is characterized by:

    • Good resistance to abrasion at both low and high temperatures

    • High level of toughness and ductility

    • Uniform and high level of machinability and polishability

    • Good high-temperature strength and resistance to thermal fatigue

    • Excellent through-hardening properties

    • Very limited distortion during hardening

    In
    steel H13, the molybdenum and vanadium act as strengthening agents. The
    chromium content assists die steel H-13 to resist softening when used
    at high temperatures. H-13 die steels offers an excellent combination of
    shock and abrasion resistance, and possesses good red hardness. It is
    capable of withstanding rapid cooling and resists premature heat
    checking. Tool Steel H13 has good machinability, good weldability, good
    ductility, and can be formed by conventional means.

    Due to H13
    tool steel excellent combination of high toughness and fatigue
    resistance, AISI H13 hot work tool steel is used more than any other
    tool steel in tooling applications.

    1. Common H13 Tool Steel Related Specifications

    Country USA German Japan
    Standard ASTM A681 DIN EN ISO 4957 JIS G4404
    Grades H13 1.2344/X40CrMoV5-1 SKD61

    2. H13 Tool Steel Chemical Composition

    ASTM A681 C Mn P S Si Cr V Mo
    H13 0.32 0.45 0.2 0.6 0.03 0.03 0.8 1.25 4.75 5.5 0.8 1.2 1.1 1.75
    DIN ISO 4957 C Mn P S Si Cr V Mo
    1.2344 /X40CrMoV5-1 0.35 0.42 0.25 0.5 0.03 0.02 0.8 1.2 4.8 5.5 0.85 1.15 1.1 1.5
    JIS G4404 C Mn P S Si Cr V Mo
    SKD61 0.35 0.42 0.25 0.5 0.03 0.02 0.8 1.2 4.8 5.5 0.8 1.15 1.0 1.5

    3. AISI H13 Steel Mechanical Properties

    Properties

    Metric Imperial
    Tensile strength, ultimate (@20°C/68°F, varies with heat treatment) 1200 – 1590 MPa 174000 – 231000 psi
    Tensile strength, yield (@20°C/68°F, varies with heat treatment) 1000 – 1380 MPa 145000 – 200000 psi
    Reduction of area (@20°C/68°F) 50.00% 50.00%
    Modulus of elasticity (@20°C/68°F) 215 GPa 31200 ksi
    Poisson’s ratio 0.27-0.30 0.27-0.30

    4. Forging of H13 Tool Steel
    Heating for forging must be done slowly and uniformly. Soak through at
    1900°-2000°F and reheat as often as necessary, stopping work when the
    temperature drops below 1650°F. After forging, cool slowly in lime,
    mica, dry ashes or furnace. H-13 should always be annealed after
    forging.

    5. Heat Treatment for H13 Tool Steels

    • Annealing

    Heat
    slowly to 1550°-1650°F, hold until entire mass is heated through, and
    cool slowly in the furnace (40F per hour) to about 1000°F, after which
    cooling rate may be increased. Suitable precautions must be taken to
    prevent excessive carburization or decarburization.

    • Stress Relieving

    When
    desirable to relieve the strains of machining, heat slowly to
    1050°-1250°F, allow to equalize, and then cool in still air (Strain
    Relieving). Â

    • Preheat Prior to Hardening

    Warm slightly before charging into the preheat furnace, which should be operating at 1400°-1500°F.

    • Hardening

    H13
    tool steel is a steel having very high hardenability and should be
    hardened by cooling in still air. The use of a salt bath or controlled
    atmosphere furnace is desirable to minimize decarburization, and if not
    available, pack hardening in spent pitch coke is suggested. The
    temperature employed is usually 1800°-1850°F, depending on size section.

    • Quenching

    Quench
    in still air or dry air blast. If complicated forms are to be hardened,
    an interrupted oil quench can be used. Quench part in oil and remove
    from bath when it just loses its color (1000°-1100°F). Finish cooling to
    below 150°-125°F in air, then temper immediately.

    • Tempering

    Tempering
    practice may vary with size and application, but is usually performed
    in the range of maximum secondary hardness or higher. Double tempering
    is recommended. The results below is H13 that was air quenched from
    1800°F and tempered for 4 hours at various temperatures. The results may
    be used as a guide, keeping in mind that parts of heavy section or mass
    may be several points lower in hardness.

    6. Application of AISI H13 Tool Steel

    • As Tools for Extrusion

    Part Aluminium, mag­nesium alloys, HRC Copper al­loys HRC Stainless steel HRC
    Dies, Backers, die-holders, liners, dummy blocks, stems 44-50 43-47 45-50
    41-50 40-48 40-48

    Austenitizing temperature

    1,870-1,885°F 1,900-1,920°F
    (1,020-1,030°C) (1,040-1,050°C)
    • As Plastic Molding Tool Steel

    Part Austenitizing temp. HRC
    Injection molds Compression/ transfer molds 1,870-1,885°F (1,020-1,030°C) 50-52
    Tempering 480°F (250°C)
    • Other Applications

    Applications Austenitizing temp HRC
    Severe cold punching, scrap shears 1,870-1,885°F 50-52
    (1,020-1,030°C)
    Tempering 480°F (250°C)
    Hot shearing 1,870-1,885°F
    (1,020-1,030°C) 50-52
    Tempering 480°F (250°C) or
    1,070-1,110°F 45-50
    (575-600°C)
    Shrink rings (e.g. for cemented carbide dies) 1,870-1,885°F 45-50
    (1,020-1,030°C)
    Tempering 1,070-1,110°F
    (575–600°C)
    Wear-resisting parts 1,870-1,885°F Core
    50-52
    Surface
    ~1000HV1
    (1,020-1,030°C)
    Tempering 1,070°F (575°C)
    nitrided

     

    If
    there are any queries about AISI H13 tool steel for hot working
    applications, please feel free to leave a comment below. And welcome
    enquiry of AISI H13 tool steel, we are professional and reliable
    supplier  for prime H13 tool steel materials.

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  • Amateur home movie. Men cutting down large tree. Very large tree falls in back garden. Winter – man up large tree attaches rope. Winch lorry. Boy smiles out of upper window of house. Girl. Tree pulled down. Tree fellers’ truck. Third tree falls. Children stand on log. Men use axes on branches. Film from train – crossing estuary in Devon? Station at Braunton for Croyde Bay. Good shots from railway train of countryside and villages. Going round bend. Steam train. Approaching tunnel. Pass airfield. Motor racing in country on public roads. Aircraft carrier – Ark Royal? Southampton? Portsmouth?
    Pond in garden. Bird in cage and Pekinese dog. Cockatoo sticks head out between bars and dogs look worried. Cockatoo on hand. Family in open-topped car. Garden rockery, flowers.
    Farnborough Air Show. Family in Rolls Royce – tent-like structure at back. Helicopters and planes. Flypast. Neat formation flying. Airliner. Red Arrows?



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    VOICEOVER (in English):

    “‘Oh, the humanity.’”

    “These words were used to described the downing of the Hindenburg airship in New Jersey on May 6, 1937.”

    “And this event marked the beginning of the end of airship travel.”

    “In the early 1900s, rigid airships, also known as dirigibles or zeppelins, were hailed as the transportation method of the future.”

    “The skies were dominated by airships, the most famous of which was the Hindenburg LZ 129.”

    “The Hindenburg was a 245-meter-long conventional zeppelin that had a maximum speed of 135 km per hour and a cruising speed of 126 km per hour.”

    “In 1936, the Hindenburg inaugurated commercial air service across the North Atlantic by carrying over 1,000 passengers on 10 scheduled round trips between Germany and the United States.”

    “Though it was designed to be filled with helium gas, the airship was filled with highly flammable hydrogen instead.”

    “This was due to the fact that the U.S. held a monopoly on helium reserves, and had restricted export of the element to Nazi Germany.”

    “Airships were designed to accommodate hundreds of passengers, who could enjoy on board facilities such as a bar, dining areas, and even a smoking lounge.”

    “In order to meet the ship’s weight requirement, all of the furnishings were made as light as possible. Even cabin beds were made of aluminum.”

    “A lightweight baby-grand piano had been created for the vessel, although it was not on board the during the Hindenburg’s last voyage.”

    “For its 63rd flight, the ship left the Frankfurt airfield at 7:16 p.m. and flew over Cologne before crossing the Netherlands, the English Channel, and out over the Atlantic before reaching the United States.”

    “On May 6, 1937, headwinds delayed the airship’s journey, and its scheduled arrival in Lakehurst, New Jersey at 6:00 a.m. was postponed to 6:00 p.m.”

    “In the meantime, the captain decided to take the passengers on a scenic tour. By noon, the ship had reached Boston, and by 3:00 p.m. the Hindenburg was sailing past the skyscrapers of Manhattan.”

    “Reports said the large vessel flying past the city created such a sight that people ran out into the streets to see it.”

    “When the aircraft was finally cleared to land, it returned to Lakehurst, approaching the field shortly after 7:00 p.m. at an altitude of approximately 600 feet.”

    “The captain initiated a wide left turn to fly in a descending pattern around the north and west of the field, to line up for a landing into the wind to the east.”

    “During the landing, hydrogen was valved and three drops of water ballast were ordered in an attempt to keep the ship in level trim.”

    “When these efforts failed to level the vessel, six crewmen were ordered to go forward in the ship to add their weight to the bow.”

    “The vessel was set to make a high-altitude landing, which meant dropping an anchor from a greater height than it normally would be.”

    “This required fewer ground crew members, but the process would take longer.”

    “In an attempt to land quickly, the captain reportedly executed a tight S-turn to change the direction of the ship’s landing.”

    “This was when things went wrong.”

    “Some experts later theorized that this sharp turn overstressed the ship, causing a bracing wire to snap and slash a gas cell. This allowed hydrogen to mix with air to form a highly explosive combination.”

    “Witnesses claimed they saw a flutter on top of the airship, which indicated gas leaking from the vessel.”

    “A fire soon broke out, although accounts of where it started varied.”

    “The flames reportedly quickly burned through the logo on the side of the ship before consuming the rest of the vessel.”

    “Journalist Herbert Morrison was at the scene doing a recorded radio segment, and his horrified account of the event became one of the most famous pieces of broadcast in American history.”

    “In the end, 36 people died, but a remarkable number of people survived.”

    “The owner of the Hindenburg initi
    —————————————-­­—————————————­-­—————-

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