13 Years manufacturer AISI304| SUS304| EN1.4948 Manufacturer in Azerbaijan

13 Years manufacturer
 AISI304| SUS304| EN1.4948 Manufacturer in Azerbaijan

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Chemical Composition of Stainless Steel 304 Table 1. Chemical composition for 304 stainless steel alloys % 304 304L 304H C 0.0 – 0.07 0.0 – 0.03 0.04 – 0.08 Mn 0.0 – 2.0 0.0 – 2.00 0.0 – 2.0 Si 0.0 – 1.00 0.0 – 1.00 0.0 – 1.0 P 0.0 – 0.05 0.0 – 0.05 0.0 – 0.04 S 0.0 – 0.03 0.0 – 0.02 0.0 – 0.02 Cr 17.50 – 19.50 17.50 – 19.50 ...


  • Length: 3-5.8mm or Customization
  • Surface: black, peeled, or rough turned
  • Heat treatment: air-cooling, normalized, annealed, Q&T
  • Smelting process: EAF+LF+VD
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    Chemical Composition of Stainless Steel 304

    Table 1. Chemical composition for 304 stainless steel alloys

    %

    304

    304L

    304H

    C

    0.0 – 0.07

    0.0 – 0.03

    0.04 – 0.08

    Mn

    0.0 – 2.0

    0.0 – 2.00

    0.0 – 2.0

    Si

    0.0 – 1.00

    0.0 – 1.00

    0.0 – 1.0

    P

    0.0 – 0.05

    0.0 – 0.05

    0.0 – 0.04

    S

    0.0 – 0.03

    0.0 – 0.02

    0.0 – 0.02

    Cr

    17.50 – 19.50

    17.50 – 19.50

    17.00 – 19.00

    Ni

    8.00 – 10.50

    8.00 – 10.50

    8.00 – 11.00

    Fe

    Balance

    Balance

    Balance

    N

    0.0-0.11

    0.0-0.11

    0.0 – 0.10

    Properties of Stainless Steel 304

    Mechanical Properties of Stainless Steel 304

    Table 2a. Mechanical properties for 304 stainless steel alloys – sheet up to 8 mm thick

    Grade

    304

    304L

    304H

    Tensile Strength (MPa)

    540 – 750

    520 – 700

    -

    Proof Stress (MPa)

    230 Min

    220 Min

    -

    Elongation A50 mm

    45 Min %

    45 Min %

    -


    Table 2b. Mechanical properties for 304 stainless steel alloys – plate from 8 – 75 mm thick

    Grade

    304

    304L

    304H

    Tensile Strength (MPa)

    520 – 720

    500 – 700

    -

    Proof Stress (MPa)

    210 Min

    200 Min

    -

    Elongation A5

    45 Min %

    45 Min %

    -


    Table 2c. Mechanical properties for 304 stainless steel alloys – bar and section up to 160 mm diameter / thickness

    Grade

    304

    304L

    304H

    Tensile Strength (MPa)

    500 – 700

    500 – 700

    500 – 700

    Proof Stress (MPa)

    190

    175 Min

    185 Min

    Elongation A50 mm

    45 Min %

    45 Min %

    40 Min %

    Hardness Brinell

    215 Max HB

    215 Max HB

    -

    Physical Properties of Stainless Steel 304

    Table 3. Physical properties for 304 stainless steel alloys

    Property

    Value

    Density

    8.00 g/cm3

    Melting Point

    1450 °C

    Modulus of Elasticity

    193 GPa

    Electrical Resistivity

    0.072 x 10-6 Ω.m

    Thermal Conductivity

    16.2 W/m.K

    Thermal Expansion

    17.2 x 10-6 /K

    Alloy Designations

    Stainless steel 304 also corresponds to the following standard designations and specifications:

    Euronorm

    UNS

    BS

    En

    Grade

    1.4301

    S30400

    304S15

    304S16

    304S31

    58E

    304

    1.4306

    S30403

    304S11

    -

    304L

    1.4307

    -

    304S11

    -

    304L

    1.4311

    -

    304S11

    -

    304L

    1.4948

    S30409

    304S51

    -

    304H

    Corrosion Resistance of Stainless Steel 304

    Stainless steel 304
    has excellent corrosion resistance in a wide variety of environments
    and when in contact with different corrosive media. Pitting and crevice
    corrosion can occur in environments containing chlorides. Stress
    corrosion cracking can occur at temperatures over 60°C.

    Heat Resistance of Stainless Steel 304

    Stainless steel 304 has
    good resistance to oxidation in intermittent service up to 870°C and in
    continuous service to 925°C. However, continuous use at 425-860°C is
    not recommended if corrosion resistance in water is required. In this
    instance 304L is recommended due to its resistance to carbide
    precipitation.

    Where high strength is required at temperatures above 500°C and up to
    800°C, grade 304H is recommended. This material will retain aqueous
    corrosion resistance.

    Fabrication of Stainless Steel 304

    Fabrication of all stainless steels should
    be done only with tools dedicated to stainless steel materials. Tooling
    and work surfaces must be thoroughly cleaned before use. These
    precautions are necessary to avoid cross contamination of stainless steel by easily corroded metals that may discolour the surface of the fabricated product.

    Cold Working of Stainless Steel 304

    Stainless steel 304 readily
    work hardens. Fabrication methods involving cold working may require an
    intermediate annealing stage to alleviate work hardening and avoid
    tearing or cracking. At the completion of fabrication a full annealing
    operation should be employed to reduce internal stresses and optimise
    corrosion resistance.

    Hot Working of Stainless Steel 304

    Fabrication methods, like forging, that involve hot working should
    occur after uniform heating to 1149-1260°C. The fabricated components
    should then be rapidly cooled to ensure maximum corrosion resistance.

    Heat Treatment of Stainless Steel 304

    Stainless steel 304 cannot be hardened by heat treatment.

    Solution treatment or annealing can be done by rapid cooling after heating to 1010-1120°C.

    Machinability

    Stainless steel 304 has good machinability. Machining can be enhanced by using the following rules:

    • Cutting edges must be kept sharp. Dull edges cause excess work hardening.

    • Cuts should be light but deep enough to prevent work hardening by riding on the surface of the material.

    • Chip breakers should be employed to assist in ensuring swarf remains clear of the work

    • Low thermal conductivity of austenitic alloys results in heat
      concentrating at the cutting edges. This means coolants and lubricants
      are necessary and must be used in large quantities.

    Welding of Stainless Steel 304

    Fusion welding performance for Stainless steel 304 is excellent both with and without fillers. Recommended filler rods and electrodes for stainless steel 304 is grade 308 stainless steel.
    For 304L the recommended filler is 308L. Heavy welded sections may
    require post-weld annealing. This step is not required for 304L. Grade
    321 may be used if post-weld heat treatment is not possible.

    Applications of Stainless Steel 304

    Stainless steel 304 is typically used in:

    • Sinks and splashbacks

    • Saucepans

    • Cutlery and flatware

    • Architectural panelling

    • Sanitaryware and troughs

    • Tubing

    • Brewery, dairy, food and pharmaceutical production equipment

    • Springs, nuts, bolts and screws

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    9/11: An Architect’s Guide | Part 1 – World Trade Center 7
    Course Number: AE911-AAG-OD1 (1 LU/HSW for each part)

    (If you are an architect and you would like to earn learning units for watching this AIA CES-approved course, we encourage you to visit http://AE911Truth.org/Continuing-Ed, where you may watch the video and take the quiz to earn units. If you already watched this video on YouTube, you may still a earn learning unit by taking the quiz at http://AE911Truth.org/Continuing-Ed/AE911-AAG-OD )

    (For the best viewing resolution click the YouTube settings on the screen and select “720p HD”)

    Live three-part webinar series. Each part is about one hour long, followed by a short Q&A. (Architects do not need to attend all three parts to earn learning units for the part(s) they attend.)

    Architects & Engineers for 9/11 Truth is pleased to be an AIA CES-approved provider of continuing education for architects. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to conducting research and providing education about the complete destruction of the three World Trade Center skyscrapers, our courses give architects the technical knowledge and analytical framework with which to evaluate the most likely cause of those building failures.

    Course Description:

    In Part 1 of “9/11: An Architect’s Guide,” Richard Gage, AIA, provides an overview of the most important evidence regarding the destruction of World Trade Center Building 7 (WTC 7), a 47-story high-rise that was not struck by an airplane.
    The damage WTC 7 suffered from the collapse of the North Tower was found to be inconsequential. It had fires that were similar to those that have occurred previously in high-rise buildings. Yet it fell symmetrically into its own footprint in the manner of a typical controlled demolition.
    In 2008, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) concluded that WTC 7’s destruction was caused by normal office fires that burned “at temperatures hundreds of degrees below those typically considered in design practice for establishing structural fire resistance ratings.”
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    3. Describe step-by-step the series of structural failures that the National Institute of Standards and Technology found to be the most likely cause of the collapse of World Trade Center Building 7.
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    Visit http://AE911Truth.org/Continuing-Ed.html for more information and to view other AIA CES-approved courses offered by AE911Truth.

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